The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers


Warner Music (0093624837923)
Movie | Released: 2002 | Format: CD, Download
 

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# Track Artist/Composer Duration
1.Foundations of Stone3:51
2.The Taming of Smeagol2:48
3.The Riders of Rohan4:05
4.The Passage of the Marshes2:46
5.The Uruk-hai2:58
6.The King of the Golden Hall3:49
7.The Black Gate is Closed3:17
8.EvenstarIsabel Bayrakdarian3:15
9.The White Rider2:28
10.Treebeard2:43
11.The Leave Taking3:41
12.Helm's Deep3:53
13.The Forbidden Pool5:27
14.Breath of LifeSheila Chandra5:07
15.The Hornburg4:36
16.Forth EarlingasBen Del Maestro3:15
17.Isengard UnleashedElizabeth Fraser/Ben Del Maestro5:01
18.Samwise the Brave3:46
19.Gollum's SongEmiliana Torrini5:51
 72:37
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The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers - 09/10 - Review of Tom Daish, submitted at
Howard Shore's Academy Award for The Fellowship of the Ring is probably the best Dramatic Score decision the Academy have made in a number of years - it is certainly pleasing that a grand, main stream fantasy score can win instead of the increasing stream of more obscure and often undeserving winners (Il Postino anyone?). Whether he can do it again, I am less easily decided, if he did, it would serve to highlight the injustice of many classy sequel scores being denied a trophy - Williams' Empire Strikes Back and Goldsmith's Final Conflict to name but two. The Two Towers is the 'dark' middle chapter in the trilogy where all hell breaks loose and things become very dark indeed. It also introduces the world of Men into the saga, which might come as a shock, but consider the characters from the first book - Hobbits, Elves, Wizards - all mythical, even if they look more or less human.

One justifiable criticism (albeit a fairly minor one) of the first score, particularly within the film itself, was the overuse of the Fellowship fanfare. There were just a few too many aerial shots of the party travelling through New Zealand, sorry, Middle Earth when the fanfare would appear. I did wonder what else Shore could do with the melody as there isn't much to it, but of course the Fellowship is disbanded at the conclusion of the first film and so the theme only appears a couple of times here. The pastoral Hobbit theme appears very infrequently too, most notably during The Taming of Sméagol, but even this appearance is short lived. Foundations of Stone opens The Two Towers in strident style with pounding brass, percussion and chorus, certainly a thrilling way to begin.

With Men being a more prominent race in the film, it is only fitting that they are given their own melody and this is, perhaps surprisingly, a fiddle melody and although it does have a strange folksy quality, it is bolstered by such rich orchestration in its first appearance during The Riders of Rohan, that it becomes stirring and impressive. Perhaps the only downside to a solo fiddle above such a surging orchestra is that the mixing becomes obvious given that a soloist couldn't really be that prominent. Two new non-human characters also get their own theme; Treebeard has a quiet march, notably featuring bassoon, one wonders whether this decision has any subconscious link with John Williams' Bassoon Concerto, The Five Sacred Trees. The other of these characters is Gollom, my precious, whose most notable moment is Gollum's Song which seems to make the end title. Certainly a surprising change in tone from Enya's finale from The Fellowship of the Ring.

The epic battle of Helm's Deep is taken up by the few tracks starting with The Hornburg and Shore has naturally written the music on a large scale, although the quasi hymnal chorus that concludes Isengard Unleashed leads me to suspect that some portion of the battle is done in slow motion, without sound effects a lá the end of the opening battle in Gladiator. Unfortunately, the middle section is a little slow going at times. The White Rider is quite beautiful, but The Forbidden Pool and Breath of Life are a bit too restrained and gloomy, not really possessed of enough emotion or dynamism to hold their own. I wonder if it is the same problem that beset something like Elfman's Sleepy Hollow where the sheer bravura of the louder sections simply overwhelms the quieter material.

In retrospect, I am perhaps less convinced by the original score than I was when I first heard it and I admit to finding The Two Towers just a little heavy going at times. It is undoubtedly spectacular, but the spectacle can wear thing on occasions while the quieter parts don't have the warmth of the first film to find the right balance. The first score was given Wagnerian allusions which, in terms of scale, are quite reasonable, but for emotional impact, perhaps just a touch hyperbolic and The Two Towers continues this trend. There are plenty of great moments and it is surely better than almost any other score this year in terms of scope and ability to thrill, but aside from the occasional hair raising moment of excitement, I find it difficult to connect with the music as much as I'd like to. However, it is superbly wrought music and likely to be an impressive support for the film, Shore continues to impress.
World Soundtrack Awards: Best Original Song Written for a Film: "Gollum’s Song" (Nominee)
Trailer:



This soundtrack trailer contains music of:

The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring (2001), Howard Shore (Track 15. The Great River) (Movie)
Requiem For A Tower, Corner Stone Cues (Movie)


Trailer:





Soundtracks from the collection: The Lord of the Rings

Lord of the Rings, The (1991)
Lord of the Rings, The (2007)
Capitaines des ténèbres (2006)
Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring, The (2001)
Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies, The (2014)
Hobbit, The (2004)
Lord of the Rings: War in the North (2011)
Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King, The (2007)
Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers, The (2006)
Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring, The (2001)


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